International Women’s Day In Bali 2020

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The women's role in Bali

The roles of women in Indonesia and most countries today are changing in many ways. A direct result of globalisation, increased modernisation, democratization, and improved education. More Indonesian women are choosing to live in cities or in areas where they can find work for personal or financial reasons rather than living under the false ideology that women act simply and solely as wives and mothers. Similar to the western world, some women choose  to juggle all the roles by being a mother, wife, provider, and community leader while keeping their families balanced and in harmony. They are becoming equals to their husbands and in some cases , exceeding their families expectations. More husbands are starting to accept this idea and approach their lives together as a team rather than deny their wives desires due to what their friends might think.  If you glance at our world history, you will see a pattern of how pride and fear contributed to the viscous cycle of global inequality between man and woman. Starting with Zenobia in 240-275 who conquered Egypt, Anatolia, Lebanon and Roman Judea. Just to name a few more; Cleopatra in 69-30 BC. Elizabeth I 1533-1603, Catherine the Great 1729-1796, Hatshepsut 1508 BC – 1458 BC, Maria Theresa of Austria 1717-1780, Empress Dowager Cixi 1835-1908, Queen Victoria 1819-1901, Theodora 500-548, Margaret Thatcher 1925-2013, Borte Ujin 1161-1230 and many others. Some might argue that , we shouldn’t even have this conversation, that women have always been equal if not greater as described above. But people seem to conveniently forget the facts for example; kingdoms and great nations were and still are ruled by great or not so great women. And most men in housholds can all agree (at least behind closed doors) that their wives are usualy the king and queen of their castle.

Remembering Where you Come from

Today is International Women’s Day. In Bali and around the world, March 8 is recognized as a time to remember the achievements of women, promote women’s issues and rights, and reflect on the steps still needed to continue gender equality. People sometimes forget all the dedication and struggles women endured throughout history. Let this day be a reminder to all women and men and not ignore the truths hidden behind egotistical walls. Remember these women who fought for equality and simple human rights. Remember these women when your rights are being tested, your liberties taken, and the next time someone challenges your equal rights.

Raden Ajeng Kartini

1776-1899

March 31,1776 (USA)– Abigail Adams makes a plea to John Adams in a letter; to “remember the ladies’ and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors.

5 October 1789 (France)Women’s Petition to the National Assembly. Feminism in France during the French revolution: Petitions were made for equal liberty, advantages, rights, nobleness, and honors between genders.

July 19-20, 1848­– (USA)The Seneca Falls Convention– Sixty-eight women and 32 men signed the Declaration of Sentiments which led to the 19th Amendment allowing women to vote. Unfortunately most of the states continued to restrict or prohibit women’s rights.

January 23, 1849 (USA)Elizabeth Blackwell becomes the first woman to graduate from medical school and become a doctor in the United States.

May 29, 1851– (USA) Sojourner Truth, a former slave turned abolitionist and women’s rights activist made a speech “Ain’t I a Woman?” at the Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio USA.

Dec. 10, 1869­– Wyoming passes America’s first woman suffrage law, granting women the right to vote and hold office.

May 15, 1869: Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton found the National Woman Suffrage Association

1879-1904 Indonesia’s first Feminist; Raden Ajeng Kartini ; advocator for women’s emancipation and education during the Dutch Colonial Rule which she passionately stood against. She also wrote about the much needed improvements in public health and the protection of traditional Javanese arts on the island of Java.

1886-Clementina Black & Women’s trade union- First successful equal pay resolution. Honorary secretary of the Women’s Trade Union League and moved an equal pay motion at the 1888 TUC Congress. In 1889, she helped form the Women’s Trade Union Association, which later became the Women’s Industrial Council.

1888-(ENG) London’s Matchgirls Strike– Annie Besant and over 1400 woman protested over poor wages and working conditions.

1890- (USA) Wyoming becomes the first state to allow women the right to vote.

1899- Australia -Women in Western Australia were granted the right to vote.

1907-1932

1907-Qualification of Woman Act

1908– 15,000 women marched in the streets of NYC, demanding better pay, shorter working hours and the right to vote.

1911- A German activist named Clara Zetkin made Woman’s Day an International day which was celebrated in 1911, in Austria, Germany, Denmark, and Switzerland after being proposed as a national day in the USA a year prior.

1912- Australia Wilhelmina (Mina) Wylie and Sarah Durack– All major sporting events in Australia banned most women from ever competing in any major sporting event until these two came along. They broke many state, national, and even world records until they were finally accepted into the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm.

April 2, 1917- Jeannette Rankin a long-time activist with the National Woman Suffrage Association, is sworn in as the first woman elected to Congress as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

1918- Voting became legalized for women at least 30 years of age and over in Britain by Constance Markievicz.

August 18 1920- (USA) “The Susan B. Anthony Amendment” or better known as the 19th Amendment allowing women to vote.

1921- W. Australia- Edith Cowan was the first woman to be elected to parliament in Australia. She campaigned for women’s rights throughout her career and co-founded the Karrakatta Club, which lobbied for the right for women to vote. She also co-founded Western Australia’s National Council of Women.

1928- Britain lowers age restriction to 21 making voting equal to men.

1929- (ENG)The ‘Flapper Election” The first general election where women were allowed to vote.

May 20-21, 1932-(USA) Amelia Earhart becomes the first woman, and second pilot ever to fly solo nonstop across the Atlantic.

1955-1974

Dec. 1, 1955,(USA) Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. The move helps launch the civil rights movement.

1956-(ENG)Equal civil service pay reform

1958-(ENG)Life peerages act; entitled women to sit in the house of the lords

June 10, 1963– (USA) President JFK signs the Equal Pay Act prohibiting sex-based wage discrimination between men and women performing the same job in the same workplace.

July 2, 1964–(USA) Lyndon B Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act banning employment discrimination based on race, religion, national origin or sex.

1960-Siramavo Bandaranaike- Sri Lanka; In 1960 she became the world’s first woman prime minister. She left office in 1965 but returned to serve two more terms (1970–77, 1994–2000) as prime minister.

1966-Indira Gandhi- India; She was the first and, to date, the only female Prime Minister of India from January 1966 to March 1977 and again from January 1980 until her assassination in October 1984.

June 30, 1966- Betty Friedan helps form Now– (National Organization for Women)

1968-(London) Fords Dagenham plant strikes which led to the Equal Pay Act.

1969- Golda Meir- Israel; The “Iron Lady” of Israeli politics was elected prime minister of Israel on March 17, 1969, after serving as Minister of Labour and Foreign Minister. The world’s fourth and Israel’s first and only woman to hold the office.

1970– (UK)Equal Pay Act

June 23, 1972(USA) Richard Nixon signs IX of the Education Amendments stopping the denial of financial aid or benefits due to a person being female

1974–(ENG)National Women’s Aid Federations aim was to end domestic violence against women and children.

1975-2016

1975–(UK)Sex discrimination Act

1975-First Women’s rights European Petition

1979- Margaret Thatcher- United Kingdom1979-1990; She was the longest-serving British prime minister of the 20th century and the first woman to hold that office.

1980-Vigdis Finnbogadottir- Iceland; The fourth President of Iceland from 1980 to 1996. She was the world’s first democratically directly elected female president. She remains the longest-serving elected female head of state of any country to date.

July 7, 1981-­ (USA) Sandra Day O’Connor becomes the first woman to serve U.S. supreme Court

June 18 1983­– Sally Ride becomes the first American woman in space

July 12, 1984– Geraldine Ferraro becomes first woman vice president nominee by a major party.

1992- (Indonesia) Susi Susanti- She was the only female badminton player to hold the Olympic, World Championship and All-England singles titles all at once and was able to give Indonesia its first gold medal in the 1992 Olympics
March 12, 1993– Janet Reno is sworn in as the first female attorney general of the USA

1997- (Indonesia) Sri Mulyani Indrawati– Not only is she a mother of three, but during the1997 Asian Financial Crisis she was the managing director and CEO of the World Bank. She ended up  setting Indonesia’s highest record for economic growth as well as using her platform to promote gender equality.
2004 to 2011– Mari Elka Pangestu became the first female Chinese Indonesian to hold a cabinet position in Indonesia. She served as Minister of Trade, Minister of Tourism and Creative Economy.

Jan. 24 2013– US removes military ban on women serving combat positions.

Sept. 13, 1994– Bill Clinton signs the Violence Against Woman Act

2001 to 2004– Megawati Sukarnoputri became the first Female Indonesian President

2003, (Indonesia) Butet Manurung- Activist and teacher. Her biggest achievements include building a alternative school and helping the lives within indigenous tribal communities while still keeping their traditions in tacked. She started Sokola Rimba a school which teaches science, reading and writing deep within remote jungles of Indonesia’s archipelagos. 

2003– Robin Lim (“Mother Robin,” or “Ibu Robin”) Mother of eight children and founder of Yayasan Bumi Sehat (Mother Earth Foundation) Combats Indonesia’s high maternal and infant mortality rates, She was awarded the 2011 CNN Hero of the Year

MEF– offers free prenatal care, birthing services and medical aid to anyone who needs it in Indonesia.

2005- Angela Merkel- Germany; Regarded as the most powerful woman in the world and to some as the leader of the free world. She has been the chancellor of Germany since 2005.

2006- (Liberia) Ellen Johnson Sirleaf- 2006-2018 ; the 24th president of Liberia. She was the first woman in Africa elected as president of her country. She won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011, in recognition of her efforts to bring women into the peacekeeping process.

2014, (Indonesia) Susi Pudjiastuti– was appointed Minister of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries

2015­-Indonesian president Joko Widodo appointed Destry Damayanti as Chief of the Corruption Eradication Commission Committee along with 8 other women.

2016­, (USA) Hillary Clinton becomes first woman to a presidential nomination from a major political party

 Robin Lim

1975-2016

1975–(UK)Sex discrimination Act

1975-First Women’s rights European Petition

1979- Margaret Thatcher- United Kingdom1979-1990; She was the longest-serving British prime minister of the 20th century and the first woman to hold that office.

1980-Vigdis Finnbogadottir- Iceland; The fourth President of Iceland from 1980 to 1996. She was the world’s first democratically directly elected female president. She remains the longest-serving elected female head of state of any country to date.

July 7, 1981­ (USA) Sandra Day O’Connor becomes the first woman to serve U.S. supreme Court

June 18 1983­– Sally Ride becomes the first American woman in space

July 12, 1984– Geraldine Ferraro becomes first woman vice president nominee by a major party.

1992- (Indonesia) Susi Susanti- She was the only female badminton player to hold the Olympic, World Championship and All-England singles titles all at once and was able to give Indonesia its first gold medal in the 1992 Olympics
March 12, 1993– Janet Reno is sworn in as the first female attorney general of the USA

1997- (Indonesia) Sri Mulyani Indrawati– Not only is she a mother of three, but during the1997 Asian Financial Crisis she was the managing director and CEO of the World Bank. She ended up  setting Indonesia’s highest record for economic growth as well as using her platform to promote gender equality.
2004 to 2011– Mari Elka Pangestu became the first female Chinese Indonesian to hold a cabinet position in Indonesia. She served as Minister of Trade, Minister of Tourism and Creative Economy.

Jan. 24, 2013– US removes military ban on women serving combat positions.

Sept. 13, 1994– Bill Clinton signs the Violence Against Woman Act

2001 to 2004– Megawati Sukarnoputri became the first Female Indonesian President

2003, (Indonesia) Butet Manurung- Activist and teacher. Her biggest achievements include building a alternative school and helping the lives within indigenous tribal communities while still keeping their traditions in tacked. She started Sokola Rimba a school which teaches science, reading and writing deep within remote jungles of Indonesia’s archipelagos. 

2003– Robin Lim (“Mother Robin,” or “Ibu Robin”) Mother of eight children and founder of Yayasan Bumi Sehat (Mother Earth Foundation) Combats Indonesia’s high maternal and infant mortality rates, She was awarded the 2011 CNN Hero of the Year

MEF– offers free prenatal care, birthing services and medical aid to anyone who needs it in Indonesia.

2005- Angela Merkel- Germany; Regarded as the most powerful woman in the world and to some as the leader of the free world. She has been the chancellor of Germany since 2005.

2006- (Liberia) Ellen Johnson Sirleaf- 2006-2018 ; the 24th president of Liberia. She was the first woman in Africa elected as president of her country. She won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011, in recognition of her efforts to bring women into the peacekeeping process.

2014, (Indonesia) Susi Pudjiastuti– was appointed Minister of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries

2015­-Indonesian president Joko Widodo appointed Destry Damayanti as Chief of the Corruption Eradication Commission Committee along with 8 other women.

2016­, (USA) Hillary Clinton becomes first woman to a presidential nomination from a major political party

Today

Today- (USA)Sabrina Paterski: The “new Einstein” a 26-year old American theoretical physicist from Chicago. Discovery Canada’s 2018 Woman’s Day Honoree and 2018 Albert Einstein Foundation Genius 100 Vision Projects “One of the 100 greatest innovators, artists, scientists and visionaries of our time’.

Today- (Pakistan) Malala Yousafzai Education Activist who in 2014, became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She was shot by the Taliban on her way to school after writing blogs for the BBC in 2009, she was only 11 years old. Her blogs were about living under the Taliban’s threats who wanted to stop education.

 “The extremists were, and they are, afraid of books and pens. The power of education frightens them. They are afraid of women… Let us pick up our books and pens. They are our most powerful weapons.” Yousafzai said to the United Nations , urging world leaders to change their ways only 9 months after she survived a gunshot wound to the head.  Her speech was made on her 16th birthday in 2013 which later became known as ‘Malala Day’ in honor of the young leader’s activism in hopes to ensure education would continue for all children.

Imagine

Imagine a rock  being dropped in a pond. Ripples are then created which travel around the world from one country to the next. These ripples continue to reach those who listen and see things through their hearts. Stories shared on the internet will hopefully transform into hope for those in harder to reach places or remind those who simply forgot. Let March 8th a guide to those who want to make a difference.  Carrying on the traditions and lessons we learn from those before us. This may seem hard, perhaps impossible for some of us, after all, even small changes take time and a deep commitment.  But even small changes can be very powerful. Start simply. Start now. You can make a difference and you may change yourself in ways you never expected.

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